quarta-feira, 15 de janeiro de 2014

Diferenças de regras para magia (em inglês)

Diferenças de regras para magia

Você sabe quais são as diferenças entre as diferentes edições e linhas de Mago em termos de regras de magia?


Não perca mais tempo, pois este post tem o resumo perfeito!

Segue o texto em inglês na integra abaixo:

Mage 1e

Mago 1ª Edição
Mago 1ª Edição
Mage 1e: Base difficulty for all Effects was highest Sphere level +3.
Mage 1e: For vulgar magic you only rolled your highest Sphere in the Effect.
Mage 1e: For coincidental magic, you rolled your Arete.
Mage 1e: There was a small list of suggested difficulty modifiers, with the ST being encouraged to add others as he saw fit.
Mage 1e: Coincidental paradox was only received on a botch, and you got one point per 1 that you rolled.
Mage 1e: With vulgar magic, you automatically gained one point of Paradox. If you botched without witnesses, you instead got one point per die rolled. If you botched with witnesses, you got two points per die rolled and usually a backlash as well.
Mage 1e: Players could trade in Paradox for flaws, choosing how it would manifest. Backlashes were under the control of the ST and could inflict damage (one level of unsoakable lethal damage per success on the backlash roll) send the character to a Paradox Realm or summon a Paradox spirit which would usually try to destroy the character.
Mage 1e: There was a general chart for successes, but certain Spheres had their own damage charts.
Mage 1e: There were a few permutations (countermagic, acting in concert) with others being added in the Book of Shadows.

Mage 2e

Mago 2ª Edição
Mago 2ª Edição
Mage 2e: Base difficulty for Effects was highest Sphere +3 for coincidental Effects, +4 for vulgar and +5 for vulgar with witnesses.
Mage 2e: You rolled your Arete for all Effects.
Mage 2e: The list of suggested difficulty modifiers got larger.
Mage 2e: Coincidental paradox was only gained on a botch, and you got one point per dot in the highest Sphere in your Effect.
Mage 2e: With vulgar magic, you automatically gained one point of Paradox. If you botched without witnesses, you instead received one point plus one per dot in the the highest Sphere in your Effect. If you botched with witnesses, this was doubled (two points, plus two per dot in the highest Sphere in your Effect.)
Mage 2e: Paradox was fully under the control of the ST. Small backlashes would produce flaws, larger ones would cause damage (one aggravated level per success on the backlash roll) and really large ones could send the character into a Paradox Realm. Paradox spirits could turn up with any level of backlash, as could Quiets.
Mage 2e: A mage could spend a point of Willpower to negate a magical botch. The spell still fails, but he, thereby protects himself from Paradox
Mage 2e: There was a unified damage chart, slightly modified for certain Spheres and unified charts for all other results.
Mage 2e: The number of permutations was greatly increased, with full descriptions in the core books. Later books presented simplified versions of the magic system for quicker games.


Mage Revised 

Mago 3ª Edição
Mago 3ª Edição/Revisado
Mage Revised: Base difficulty for Effects was highest Sphere +3 for coincidental Effects, +4 for vulgar and +5 for vulgar with witnesses.
Mage Revised: You rolled your Arete for all Effects.
Mage Revised: The list of suggested difficulty modifiers got even larger.
Mage Revised: Coincidental botches again produced Paradox, equal to the number of dots in the highest Sphere in the Effect.
Mage Revised: Vulgar magic without witnesses automatically generated one point of Paradox per dot in the highest Sphere used. With witnesses, you received one point of Paradox per dot in the highest Sphere used, plus one. For a vulgar botch without witnesses, you also one point of Paradox per dot in the highest Sphere used, plus one, and for a vulgar botch with witnesses, this was doubled (two points per highest Sphere used, plus two.)
Mage Revised: You still took damage, but it was generally bashing damage. Lethal and aggravated damage could happen, but only with really large backlashes. Flaws, spirits and Paradox realms also scaled with the size of the Backlash.
Mage Revised: A mage could spend a point of Willpower to delay the effect of Paradox until the end of the scene. All Paradox acquired would then stack until the end of the scene, at which point it would take effect, likely resulting in a single larger backlash rather than several smaller ones.
Mage Revised: There were many permutations, Resonance was codified in the rules and expanded upon in later books.

Mage: the Sorcerer's Crusade

Mago: A Cruzada dos Feiticeiros
Mago: A Cruzada dos Feiticeiros
Mage: the Sorcerer's Crusade: At its core, the magic system here was more or less the same as the one used in Mage 2e. The main change was in the Paradox system (called the Scourge.) You rolled a Fortune Die with every magical Effect (plus another Fortune Die for every 5 points in your Scourge Pool/Paradox Pool.) If the Fortune Dice came up a 1, you suffered a Bane - a bad backlash. If the Fortune Dice came up a 10, you received a Boon - a beneficial result. So "Paradox" could work in your favour as well as work against you.
If the ST wanted to use the option, you could also receive damage (branding), get funny marks on your body, affect the area around you, summon Paradox Spirits ("scourgelings"), be imprisoned in a Paradox realm and suffer Jhor or Quiet.

Anybody feel like stepping up and doing Dark Ages? My hands are hurting now ...

No takers? OK, here I go

Dark Ages Mage

Mago: Idade das Trevas
Mago: Idade das Trevas
 Dark Ages Mage has many, many differences from Mage: the Ascension, so much so that it should be considered a separate game line, rather than a separate edition. The differences aren't as pronounced as between Ascension and Awakening (although in some areas, they are), but they are nevertheless worth noting.

Dark Ages Mage: Quintessence expenditure and recovery is treated slightly differently than in the modern games (it is more generous on the whole.)
Dark Ages Mage: Mages have an Aura, which is similar in some respects to Resonance, affecting how others feel about and interact with the Mage.
Dark Ages Mage: Arete is replaced by a trait called Foundation, which measures both a character's magical might, as well as their understanding of and adherence to their paradigm (it should be noted that Paradigm doesn't get much discussion - its importance is hard-wired into the rules through Foundation, making its relevance more immediately apparent). Each mage's Foundation is determined by their belief system, and acting contrary to one's Foundation can hamper its development.
Dark Ages Mage: Spheres are replaced by Pillars. Each Foundation has (usually) four Pillars attached to it. The Pillars mirror the effects of the Spheres, but tend to be narrower in focus (although they often combine the areas of influence of two or more Spheres). Pillars are tightly linked to Foundation and Paradigm in their effects.
Dark Ages Mage: You can cast spells with Pillars higher than your Foundation, but you must spend Quintessence to do so (unlike the modern games, where your Arete caps your Spheres.)
Dark Ages Mage: Spells are basically divided into Simple and Complex. Simple spells use one Pillar, Complex spells use more than one.
The base difficulty for Simple spells is 4 + the level of the Pillar used.
The base difficulty for Complex spells is 5 + the level of the primary Pillar used, +1 per additional Pillar.
Dark Ages Mage: Dark Ages Mage uses thresholds, like Revised.
Dark Ages Mage: For Simple spells, you roll Foundation + Pillar.
Dark Ages Mage: For Complex spells , you roll Foundation + Pillar, +1 die per additional Pillar.
Dark Ages Mage: Extended castings work like in the modern game. Long-duration or permanent Effects require Quintessence (and possibly Willpower) expenditure.
Dark Ages Mage: There are a few permutations and difficulty modifiers (countermagic is used, foci and local belief systems can modify difficulties or reduce the chance of botching.)
Dark Ages Mage: There is a distinction between normal casting and hurried casting, with separate success charts for each (similar to what is seen in Mage: the Awakening.)
Dark Ages Mage: Paradox is called Backlash and strikes when a spell is botched. You basically multiply the number of 1s rolled by the highest Pillar (with various modifiers) to determine the severity of the Backlash, which can take the form of Branding (weird alterations to the mage), Manifestation (similar to Paradox spirits), Scourging (lethal or aggravated damage) or Twilight (like Quiet). The exact method of multiplication depends on the type of Backlash. Quintessence can be used to mitigate the effects of Backlash.


Fonte: http://calloftea.com/forum/index.php?topic=3625.0
Agradecimentos especiais a Igor Couto por fornecer o link.


Qual a edição/linha de Mago você joga? Quais são as melhores regras de magia? Comente aí.

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3 comentários:

Licorne Negro disse...

Numa comparação mais ampla, seria legal se falassem também de Mage: The Awakening e Ars Magica. O último, apesar de não ser da WW/OP, foi criado pelo cara que deu o pontapé inicial no cWoD (e portanto, em tudo que veio/virá da WW/OP), e tem um sistema de magia que eu acho interessantíssimo!

Mauricio Ramos Canavarro Costa disse...

Licorne, o texto em inglês (que aparece em itálico) não foi escrito por mim. Eu só tomei a liberdade de trazê-lo para cá, pois o achei muito interessante e útil. Se surgir um texto falando das diferenças para esses dois outros jogos que você citou eu posso vir a incluí-lo aqui no blog, mas será como outro post. Eu não tenho conhecimento para fazer uma comparação desse tipo e como a proposta de Mago O Despertar não me agrada eu não faço muita questão.

É preciso ter em mente que Mago O Despertar é uma linha totalmente diferente. É outro universo. Quanto a Ars Magica, até então eu só ouvi falar por alto. De qualquer modo é outro jogo também. Talvez eu traga alguma coisa dele em outra oportunidade, como uma referência ou um modelo diferente para jogar o Ascension.

Mumu disse...

As regras de Mago O Despertar são bem mais sólidas do que as vistas nos livros da linha Ascensão. O ideal é aproveitar as regras daquele com o cenário deste.

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